/page/2

Just some stuff from some guys I know.

unexplained-events:

unexplained-events:

Creepy ASS Taxidermy

Some people take taxidermy to an entirely new level of creepy…

They are deer butts, for all those who are asking

(via ebola-zaire)

bennydiar:

#BennyDIAR ‘04.. #DTC #KYT @dtc_kyt.. Beautiful pic recently caught by & reposted from @johnny_no_pants.. #traingraffiti

bennydiar:

#BennyDIAR ‘04.. #DTC #KYT @dtc_kyt.. Beautiful pic recently caught by & reposted from @johnny_no_pants.. #traingraffiti

itstactical:

What’s in your Everyday Carry? If you’re looking to upgrade your EDC, check out the ITS EDC Shop.

itstactical:

What’s in your Everyday Carry? If you’re looking to upgrade your EDC, check out the ITS EDC Shop.

(via everyday-cutlery)

everydaycarry:


Oakley Servo XL Glasses
Homemade Paracord Bracelet
Moleskine Cashier Journal
Gerber Dime (The Best Micro Multi Tool By Far)
Gerber Shard
Nite Ize Inova Microlight STS
SanDisk Cruzer Blade 32GB (I keep a bootable version of Hiren on this)
Boba Fett iPhone Wallet with…
Credit Card Survival Tool
Fisher Space Pen
iPhone 5s
Gerber Ripstop I
Handmade Star Wars Handkerchief from my wife

IT in New Hampshire

Read More

everydaycarry:

IT in New Hampshire

Read More

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
Four Egyptian protesters were killed on Thursday when security forces clashed with demonstrations to honor the one year anniversary of the crackdown on protesters in Rabaa which left a thousand dead. 
The police chief in Tripoli, Libya, has been assassinated.
The US sent $10 million in Pentagon emergency spending money to assist France’s fight against terrorism in northwestern Africa. 
The appointment of the Central African Republic’s first Muslim PM, Mahamat Kamoun, has been rejected by rebel group Seleka.
Israel and Gaza began a five day ceasefire on Thursday.
Rahed Taysir Al-Hom, who headed northern Gaza’s sole bomb disposal unit, died defusing an unexploded 500kg bomb on Wednesday.
AP videojournalist Simone Camilli and his freelance Palestinian translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash were killed when a previously unexploded bomb detonated in Gaza.
For Gaza’s wounded, and its overwhelmed hospitals, an excruciating battle continues.
Canadian law professor William Schabas has been appointed head of the UN’s commission to investigate Israel for war crimes in Gaza — to Israel’s vocal displeasure.
Assad’s forces have retaken Mleiha, a key Damascus district.
The Islamic State has seized a number of towns in Aleppo.
After weeks of struggle, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki agreed to step down, accepting Haider al-Abadi’s candidacy.
The rise of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi and of the Islamic State/ISIS and its inextricable connection to US involvement in Iraq.
The Islamic States is putting effort into establishing cells outside of Syria and Iraq.
IS seizes on wheat supplies as an economic weapon.
Watch Vice’s full-length documentary on ISIS here.
The situation with the Yazidis stranded on Mount Sinjar seems to have both markedly improved and been overestimated in the first place… did US intelligence misjudge the humanitarian situation? Yazidi leaders strongly resist the claim that the crisis is over.
A helicopter delivering aid on Tuesday in northern Iraq crashed, killing the pilot, and injuring New York Times reporter Alissa Rubin.
EU foreign ministers are holding an emergency meeting in Brussels today to discussing arming the Kurds.
Attah Mohammed Noor — Balkh province’s governor, former warlord, and powerful ally of Abdullah Abdullah — has warned of “civil unrest” should the vote recount be biased.
Pakistan foiled a militant attack on an airbase on the outskirts of Quetta.
Pro-Russian separatists in Donetsk on Wednesday ambushed a Bush carrying Ukrainian soldiers — twelve of whom were killed. An unknown number were taken captive.
Russian Alexander Borodai has resigned as prime minister of the separatist Donetsk People’s Republic, ceding the title to a Ukrainian named Alexander Zakharchenko. Its military leader, Igor Girkin — AKA Strelkov — has also resigned.
Tensions between Russia and Ukraine are aggravated by a Russian aid convoy to the separatists.
Putin sought to act as peacemaker between Azerbaijan and Armenia after renewed fighting over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh territory has resulted in dozens of deaths recently. Both Azerbaijan and Armenia, however, are skeptical of Russian intentions — both agreeing that Russia should not send in peacekeeping forces.
Azerbaijan has detained four of its most prominent human rights activists and advocates. 
NATO is close to an agreement to bolster its presence in Eastern Europe.
WIRED profiles Edward Snowden.
Former DARPA head Regina Duggan reportedly violated internal ethics regulations in discussing products sold by the company she founded with Pentagon officials during her tenure. 
I wrote a feature article for The Atlantic online about a war photograph from Desert Storm. 
Photo: Al Shaaf neighborhood of Gaza City. A Palestinian man surveys the destruction. Alessio Romenzi for TIME.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: Al Shaaf neighborhood of Gaza City. A Palestinian man surveys the destruction. Alessio Romenzi for TIME.

(via sidewaysburnouts)

medicalschool:

Heparin is widely used as an injectable anticoagulant. (It can also be used to form an inner anticoagulant surface on various experimental and medical devices such as test tubes and renal dialysis machines.)
Heparin is a naturally occurring anticoagulant produced by basophils and mast cells. Heparin acts as an anticoagulant, preventing the formation of clots and extension of existing clots within the blood. While heparin does not break down clots that have already formed (unlike tissue plasminogen activator), it allows the body’s natural clot lysis mechanisms to work normally to break down clots that have formed.
Heparin is generally used for anticoagulation for the following conditions:
Acute coronary syndrome (e.g., NSTEMI)
Atrial fibrillation
Deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism
Cardiopulmonary bypass for heart surgery
ECMO circuit for extracorporeal life support
Hemofiltration
Indwelling central or peripheral venous catheters

medicalschool:

Heparin is widely used as an injectable anticoagulant. (It can also be used to form an inner anticoagulant surface on various experimental and medical devices such as test tubes and renal dialysis machines.)

Heparin is a naturally occurring anticoagulant produced by basophils and mast cells. Heparin acts as an anticoagulant, preventing the formation of clots and extension of existing clots within the blood. While heparin does not break down clots that have already formed (unlike tissue plasminogen activator), it allows the body’s natural clot lysis mechanisms to work normally to break down clots that have formed.

Heparin is generally used for anticoagulation for the following conditions:

  • Acute coronary syndrome (e.g., NSTEMI)
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism
  • Cardiopulmonary bypass for heart surgery
  • ECMO circuit for extracorporeal life support
  • Hemofiltration
  • Indwelling central or peripheral venous catheters

(Source: Wikipedia)

shabaash:

mauridianhallow:

lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity


I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.


This is so selfless and wonderful.

shabaash:

mauridianhallow:

lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity

I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.

This is so selfless and wonderful.

(via apeachylife)

fuckyeahsternshow:

I’m telling you this with peace and love.

fuckyeahsternshow:

I’m telling you this with peace and love.

tastefullyoffensive:

Artist Chris McMahon buys other people’s landscape paintings at thrift stores and puts monsters in them.

Previously: Artist Repaints His Own Childhood Drawings

(via 666deadlysins)

nprglobalhealth:

Feeling The Heat, Burning The Suits: Reporting On Ebola From Sierra Leone

NPR’s Jason Beaubien is in Sierra Leone, covering the Ebola outbreak that began in March in Guinea and has spread to neighboring countries. When we spoke Thursday, he had just toured the treatment center built by Doctors Without Borders in the town of Kailahun. With 64 beds, it’s the largest Ebola isolation ward ever built. Currently there are 31 patients.

How’s it going?

Never a dull day here.

Can you describe the treatment center?

It’s basically a compound with a series of different tents. There are tents where people get suited up to go in. Another tent seems to be for storage, and one of the tents contains a lab. Then there’s a double fence about 3 1/2 feet high, made of orange plastic mesh. They designed the fence so people can see where the patients are, so it wouldn’t seem as if the patients are completely walled off.

Why a double fence?

So no one can get within 6 feet of someone who has Ebola. In case a patient from the isolation area reaches out or vomits, [Doctors Without Borders] wants to make sure there won’t be any accidental contamination.

How do the doctors record information on the patients?

Doctors go into the isolation area completely suited up, do their rounds and write down what’s happening with patients. Then they stand next to the fence and shout out to people on the other side of the fence [information about each patient]. Say, for patient 105, the doctor says, “diarrhea, vomiting.” Then the doctor’s notes [made inside the isolation area] are burned.

Where do they burn the notes?

They have a big pit in the back.

What else do they burn?

They burn everything. They say nothing comes out of isolation — although obviously they’re taking blood samples out. People come out. They strip off their protective gear, the Tyvek suits they put over their entire body and shoes.

Continue reading.

Top: Construction workers repair the roof inside the isolation area at the Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Kailahun.

Bottom: All workers in the isolation area must wear a head-to-toe protective suit.

Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Just some stuff from some guys I know.

unexplained-events:

unexplained-events:

Creepy ASS Taxidermy

Some people take taxidermy to an entirely new level of creepy…

They are deer butts, for all those who are asking

(via ebola-zaire)

bennydiar:

#BennyDIAR ‘04.. #DTC #KYT @dtc_kyt.. Beautiful pic recently caught by & reposted from @johnny_no_pants.. #traingraffiti

bennydiar:

#BennyDIAR ‘04.. #DTC #KYT @dtc_kyt.. Beautiful pic recently caught by & reposted from @johnny_no_pants.. #traingraffiti

itstactical:

What’s in your Everyday Carry? If you’re looking to upgrade your EDC, check out the ITS EDC Shop.

itstactical:

What’s in your Everyday Carry? If you’re looking to upgrade your EDC, check out the ITS EDC Shop.

(via everyday-cutlery)

alwaysstarwars:

Missing Moments by Chris Trevas

everydaycarry:


Oakley Servo XL Glasses
Homemade Paracord Bracelet
Moleskine Cashier Journal
Gerber Dime (The Best Micro Multi Tool By Far)
Gerber Shard
Nite Ize Inova Microlight STS
SanDisk Cruzer Blade 32GB (I keep a bootable version of Hiren on this)
Boba Fett iPhone Wallet with…
Credit Card Survival Tool
Fisher Space Pen
iPhone 5s
Gerber Ripstop I
Handmade Star Wars Handkerchief from my wife

IT in New Hampshire

Read More

everydaycarry:

IT in New Hampshire

Read More

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
Four Egyptian protesters were killed on Thursday when security forces clashed with demonstrations to honor the one year anniversary of the crackdown on protesters in Rabaa which left a thousand dead. 
The police chief in Tripoli, Libya, has been assassinated.
The US sent $10 million in Pentagon emergency spending money to assist France’s fight against terrorism in northwestern Africa. 
The appointment of the Central African Republic’s first Muslim PM, Mahamat Kamoun, has been rejected by rebel group Seleka.
Israel and Gaza began a five day ceasefire on Thursday.
Rahed Taysir Al-Hom, who headed northern Gaza’s sole bomb disposal unit, died defusing an unexploded 500kg bomb on Wednesday.
AP videojournalist Simone Camilli and his freelance Palestinian translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash were killed when a previously unexploded bomb detonated in Gaza.
For Gaza’s wounded, and its overwhelmed hospitals, an excruciating battle continues.
Canadian law professor William Schabas has been appointed head of the UN’s commission to investigate Israel for war crimes in Gaza — to Israel’s vocal displeasure.
Assad’s forces have retaken Mleiha, a key Damascus district.
The Islamic State has seized a number of towns in Aleppo.
After weeks of struggle, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki agreed to step down, accepting Haider al-Abadi’s candidacy.
The rise of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi and of the Islamic State/ISIS and its inextricable connection to US involvement in Iraq.
The Islamic States is putting effort into establishing cells outside of Syria and Iraq.
IS seizes on wheat supplies as an economic weapon.
Watch Vice’s full-length documentary on ISIS here.
The situation with the Yazidis stranded on Mount Sinjar seems to have both markedly improved and been overestimated in the first place… did US intelligence misjudge the humanitarian situation? Yazidi leaders strongly resist the claim that the crisis is over.
A helicopter delivering aid on Tuesday in northern Iraq crashed, killing the pilot, and injuring New York Times reporter Alissa Rubin.
EU foreign ministers are holding an emergency meeting in Brussels today to discussing arming the Kurds.
Attah Mohammed Noor — Balkh province’s governor, former warlord, and powerful ally of Abdullah Abdullah — has warned of “civil unrest” should the vote recount be biased.
Pakistan foiled a militant attack on an airbase on the outskirts of Quetta.
Pro-Russian separatists in Donetsk on Wednesday ambushed a Bush carrying Ukrainian soldiers — twelve of whom were killed. An unknown number were taken captive.
Russian Alexander Borodai has resigned as prime minister of the separatist Donetsk People’s Republic, ceding the title to a Ukrainian named Alexander Zakharchenko. Its military leader, Igor Girkin — AKA Strelkov — has also resigned.
Tensions between Russia and Ukraine are aggravated by a Russian aid convoy to the separatists.
Putin sought to act as peacemaker between Azerbaijan and Armenia after renewed fighting over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh territory has resulted in dozens of deaths recently. Both Azerbaijan and Armenia, however, are skeptical of Russian intentions — both agreeing that Russia should not send in peacekeeping forces.
Azerbaijan has detained four of its most prominent human rights activists and advocates. 
NATO is close to an agreement to bolster its presence in Eastern Europe.
WIRED profiles Edward Snowden.
Former DARPA head Regina Duggan reportedly violated internal ethics regulations in discussing products sold by the company she founded with Pentagon officials during her tenure. 
I wrote a feature article for The Atlantic online about a war photograph from Desert Storm. 
Photo: Al Shaaf neighborhood of Gaza City. A Palestinian man surveys the destruction. Alessio Romenzi for TIME.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: Al Shaaf neighborhood of Gaza City. A Palestinian man surveys the destruction. Alessio Romenzi for TIME.

(via sidewaysburnouts)

(Source: xpunkindrublicx)

medicalschool:

Heparin is widely used as an injectable anticoagulant. (It can also be used to form an inner anticoagulant surface on various experimental and medical devices such as test tubes and renal dialysis machines.)
Heparin is a naturally occurring anticoagulant produced by basophils and mast cells. Heparin acts as an anticoagulant, preventing the formation of clots and extension of existing clots within the blood. While heparin does not break down clots that have already formed (unlike tissue plasminogen activator), it allows the body’s natural clot lysis mechanisms to work normally to break down clots that have formed.
Heparin is generally used for anticoagulation for the following conditions:
Acute coronary syndrome (e.g., NSTEMI)
Atrial fibrillation
Deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism
Cardiopulmonary bypass for heart surgery
ECMO circuit for extracorporeal life support
Hemofiltration
Indwelling central or peripheral venous catheters

medicalschool:

Heparin is widely used as an injectable anticoagulant. (It can also be used to form an inner anticoagulant surface on various experimental and medical devices such as test tubes and renal dialysis machines.)

Heparin is a naturally occurring anticoagulant produced by basophils and mast cells. Heparin acts as an anticoagulant, preventing the formation of clots and extension of existing clots within the blood. While heparin does not break down clots that have already formed (unlike tissue plasminogen activator), it allows the body’s natural clot lysis mechanisms to work normally to break down clots that have formed.

Heparin is generally used for anticoagulation for the following conditions:

  • Acute coronary syndrome (e.g., NSTEMI)
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism
  • Cardiopulmonary bypass for heart surgery
  • ECMO circuit for extracorporeal life support
  • Hemofiltration
  • Indwelling central or peripheral venous catheters

(Source: Wikipedia)

shabaash:

mauridianhallow:

lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity


I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.


This is so selfless and wonderful.

shabaash:

mauridianhallow:

lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity

I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.

This is so selfless and wonderful.

(via apeachylife)

fuckyeahsternshow:

I’m telling you this with peace and love.

fuckyeahsternshow:

I’m telling you this with peace and love.

tastefullyoffensive:

Artist Chris McMahon buys other people’s landscape paintings at thrift stores and puts monsters in them.

Previously: Artist Repaints His Own Childhood Drawings

(via 666deadlysins)

nprglobalhealth:

Feeling The Heat, Burning The Suits: Reporting On Ebola From Sierra Leone

NPR’s Jason Beaubien is in Sierra Leone, covering the Ebola outbreak that began in March in Guinea and has spread to neighboring countries. When we spoke Thursday, he had just toured the treatment center built by Doctors Without Borders in the town of Kailahun. With 64 beds, it’s the largest Ebola isolation ward ever built. Currently there are 31 patients.

How’s it going?

Never a dull day here.

Can you describe the treatment center?

It’s basically a compound with a series of different tents. There are tents where people get suited up to go in. Another tent seems to be for storage, and one of the tents contains a lab. Then there’s a double fence about 3 1/2 feet high, made of orange plastic mesh. They designed the fence so people can see where the patients are, so it wouldn’t seem as if the patients are completely walled off.

Why a double fence?

So no one can get within 6 feet of someone who has Ebola. In case a patient from the isolation area reaches out or vomits, [Doctors Without Borders] wants to make sure there won’t be any accidental contamination.

How do the doctors record information on the patients?

Doctors go into the isolation area completely suited up, do their rounds and write down what’s happening with patients. Then they stand next to the fence and shout out to people on the other side of the fence [information about each patient]. Say, for patient 105, the doctor says, “diarrhea, vomiting.” Then the doctor’s notes [made inside the isolation area] are burned.

Where do they burn the notes?

They have a big pit in the back.

What else do they burn?

They burn everything. They say nothing comes out of isolation — although obviously they’re taking blood samples out. People come out. They strip off their protective gear, the Tyvek suits they put over their entire body and shoes.

Continue reading.

Top: Construction workers repair the roof inside the isolation area at the Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Kailahun.

Bottom: All workers in the isolation area must wear a head-to-toe protective suit.

Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR

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